bienenkiste:

Cici Xiang by Stockton Johnson for Harper’s Bazaar Vietnam January 2014

bienenkiste:

Cici Xiang by Stockton Johnson for Harper’s Bazaar Vietnam January 2014

supermodelgif:

"Malice in Wonderland" Christina Ricci by Mario Sorrenti for The Face, February 1998

supermodelgif:

"Malice in Wonderland" Christina Ricci by Mario Sorrenti for The Face, February 1998

pivoslyakova:

Chrystal Copland by Tim Walker | Jo Malone Peony & Blush Suede, Fall/Winter 2013.

pivoslyakova:

Chrystal Copland by Tim Walker | Jo Malone Peony & Blush Suede, Fall/Winter 2013.

it makes me really sad people call lise meitner the mother of the atomic bomb because she abohored it and had nothing to do with the it like someone wrote an article called the woman behind th bomb SHE REFUSED TO WORK ON IT SHE WAS SAD IT WAS COMPLTED AND USED DONT ASSOCIATE HER WITH THE HORRIBLE BOMB ASSOCIATE HER WITH SCIENCE

I mean just look at her chilling in a greenhouse

I mean just look at her chilling in a greenhouse

i truly love lise meitner because she discovered the theory behind fission and the potential for chain reactions but when the US goverment asked her to work on the bomb she refused as she was against the bomb and after the bomb was used she said she was sad the bomb was invented 

the-treble:

bonusvampirus:

*makes heterophobic text post*

It’s a metaphor, see? You make a mean text post, but you don’t back it with thousands of years of violently-upheld institutional power, so it doesn’t have the power to actually hurt anyone. 

best one yet

Nancy Wake, who has died in London just before her 99th birthday, was a New Zealander brought up in Australia. She became a nurse, a journalist who interviewed Adolf Hitler, a wealthy French socialite, a British agent and a French resistance leader. She led 7,000 guerrilla fighters in battles against the Nazis in the northern Auvergne, just before the D-Day landings in 1944. On one occasion, she strangled an SS sentry with her bare hands. On another, she cycled 500 miles to replace lost codes. In June 1944, she led her fighters in an attack on the Gestapo headquarters at Montlucon in central France.

Ms Wake was furious the TV series [later made about her life] suggested she had had a love affair with one of her fellow fighters. She was too busy killing Nazis for amorous entanglements, she said.

Nancy recalled later in life that her parachute had snagged in a tree. The French resistance fighter who freed her said he wished all trees bore “such beautiful fruit.” Nancy retorted: “Don’t give me that French shit.”

"Resistance heroine who led 7,000 men against the Nazis," The Independent. (via madelinecoleman)

"Ms Wake […] had mixed feelings about previous cinematic efforts to portray her wartime exploits, including a TV mini-series made in 1987.

'It was well-acted but in parts it was extremely stupid,' she said. 'At one stage they had me cooking eggs and bacon to feed the men. For goodness' sake, did the Allies parachute me into France to fry eggs and bacon for the men? There wasn't an egg to be had for love nor money. Even if there had been why would I be frying it? I had men to do that sort of thing.’”

(via kerrypolka)

generalbriefing:

Yep this pretty much covers how history is taught here

(Source: sandandglass)

thematildaeffect:

Spotlight on Dr. Roger Arliner Young

Dr. Roger Arliner Young was the first African-American woman to receive a doctorate in zoology. She was also the first African-American woman to publish in Nature. Her most famous work was on salt concentration and how it was controlled in paramecium. Although she never won any major awards, she faced racial, gender, class, and mental health barriers throughout her entire life, it’s clear that she was a genius.

Dr. Roger Arliner Young was born in Clifton Forge, Virginia in 1889. She began classes in music at Howard University in 1916, and wouldn’t take her first science course until 1921. She struggled with her grades, but mentors like Ernest Everret Just supported her, and she graduated in 1923. In 1924, she started attending the University of Chicago to get her masters. It was that year that she became the first African-American woman to be published in Nature, one of the top science journals. Her paper was about excretion of salt in paramecium, and it’s relation to the hydration and dehydration of cells. This was amazing, not only due to the scientific knowledge she contributed, but because she wasn’t even a graduate student when she accomplished this.

She received her masters in 1926, but was faced with many difficulties as she tried to get her doctorate. She returned to the University of Chicago in 1929 to get her doctorate, but failed her qualifying exams. She took some time off from science between 1930-1935, teaching at Howard University. However, rumors started to circulate about her and her mentor Ernest Everret Just, and she left Howard University. In 1937, she entered the doctoral program at the University of Pennsylvania. She finally received her doctorate in 1940. Her dissertation was on the effects of ultraviolet radiation on marine eggs.

She continued teaching and research after her dissertation, but never published again. Due to mental health problems, she spent was hospitalized in the late 1950’s. She was discharged in 1962, but died in 1964, very poor. Very little has been written on her, due to both racism and sexism. I could not find any long form biography for her, but I encourage everyone to check out the sources below. She was one of the few African-American women to do scientific research before WWII, as numerous racial and gender barriers existed. These barriers still exist today.

I apologize both pictures are the same but I had trouble finding any pictures of her besides this one.

Sources: Scientific American, SDSC, UCI